I read this book for obvious reasons. I run a blog, but I also want to be known as a blogger. I want a bigger readership, and I currently want to be paid to blog. If this site never gets monetized I’d be perfectly fine, but getting checks for writing has always been my life goal.

In any case, Blog,Inc. talks about why blogging is good to build the brand of a creative. Joy Cho runs her own blog, Oh Joy!, and, in this book, she goes step by step over what you need to know about building a blog of your own. Littered throughout this book are Cho’s interviews with eighteen other bloggers about why they decided blog and how it changed their lives. I liked this book simply because it made me think about what I really want to do with this blog, and how I should go about getting more readers.

Like, recently I changed the layout. That wasn’t because of Blog, Inc., I really just wanted a change. However Blog, Inc. does recommend changing your layout once a year. To me that’s understandable. I rarely keep the same settings on things for a solid year, so why should my layouts be the same boring stuff I picked up two or three years ago? I also updated some of my information on my Facebook and Twitter, which Cho recommends is necessary so that people can find you across as many social networks as possible.

Another thing that Blog, Inc. talks about is building community. I’m not so great at that. I like people, but it’s gotten harder for me to make friends as the years have gone by. And internet friends are a hard bunch for me to keep up with. Still, in order for one to grow a big blog, one must be known by the other blogs in the area. That creates discussion, and it also helps you to grow as a blogger. I don’t expect to make new internet friends overnight, but I could stand to follow some new blogs as well as look at the blogs of my current followers.

The book’s chapters are pretty self-explanatory so you know what to expect when you get into it. I recommend the chapters on “Making Your Blog a Business”, and “Monetizing Your Blog”. Those two chapters go in depth about what you need to do when you go about trying to get paid to blog. There is even an outline about what is needed when presenting your business plan to prospective sponsors.

I appreciated that there was a big break down of so many blogging terms. Technically I have been blogging for years, but I’ve never been very constant about it, nor have I been so focused on it. So while Blog, Inc. was pretty basic, it was extremely helpful for someone like me who never really took the time to think about any of this.

I liked that, at the end of the book, Cho makes a point to talk about how you should make sure to use your blog to help others. Everyone’s so interested in making money from blogging that no one ever really talks about giving back. I think that might be what set Cho’s blogging guide apart from the others.

I recommend this book to anyone who has ever so much as thought about having a blog, whether you write or just want to expand your business. It doesn’t hurt to keep your customers up-to-date about what’s going on with your products. Or even if you don’t have anything to sell and just want to talk about what’s going on in your world, I would recommend this book to you. You would be surprised at how many people could relate to your story, or just how much you could learn from your followers. There’s definitely something that even the most casual of bloggers can learn from this book.

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